Saturday, February 28, 2015

Total private donations received by Illinois colleges in 2014

 

Top 10 public colleges

10. Oakton Community College

oakton community college

  • Amount raised:  $814,552
  • Classification: 2-year

9. Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville

siue_logo

  • Amount raised:  $2.72 million
  • Classification: Master’s

8. College of DuPage

COD

  • Amount raised:  $3.57 million
  • Classification: 2-year

7. University of Illinois at Springfield

UIS

  • Amount raised:  $3.69 million
  • Classification: Master’s

6. Western Illinois University

western illinois university

  • Amount raised:  $6.60 million
  • Classification: Master’s

5. Eastern Illinois University

Eastern_Illinois_University_

  • Amount raised:  $6.81 million
  • Classification: Master’s

4. Illinois State University

illinois state university

  • Amount raised:  $9.01 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

3. Northern Illinois University

NIU

  • Amount raised:  $9.60 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

2. University of Illinois at Chicago

UIC

  • Amount raised:  $66.51 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

U of I Urbana Champaign

  • Amount raised:  $177.19 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

University of Illinois system summary – $253 million

Top 10 private colleges

10. Augustana College

Augustana

  • Amount raised:  $9.87 million
  • Classification: Baccalaureate

9. North Park University

North Park

  • Amount raised:  $10.81 million
  • Classification: Master’s

8. Millikin University

millikin

  • Amount raised:  $13.82 million
  • Classification: Baccalaureate

7. Knox College

knox+college

  • Amount raised:  $19.52 million
  • Classification: Baccalaureate

6. DePaul University

depaul university

  • Amount raised:  $23.63 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

5. Illinois Institute of Technology

illinois-institute-of-technology

  • Amount raised:  $26.05 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

4. Wheaton College

Wheaton_College_

  • Amount raised:  $33.02 million
  • Classification: Master’s

3. Loyola University Chicago

loyola

  • Amount raised:  $37.88 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

2. University of Chicago

university of chicago

  • Amount raised:  $405.35 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

1. Northwestern University

northwestern

  • Amount raised:  $616.35 million
  • Classification: Research / Doctoral

Above is from REBOOT:  Total private donations received by Illinois colleges in 2014

Friday, February 27, 2015

Association for Black Culture Centers to move headquarters to NIU July 1 | NIU Today

 

Organization serves African American, Latino, Native American and Asian American campus culture centers

ABCCNorthern Illinois University today announced that the Association for Black Culture Centers (ABCC) will relocate its headquarters to the NIU DeKalb main campus, effective July 1, 2015. The association—which serves African American, Latino, Native American and Asian American campus culture centers across the country—is currently headquartered at Knox College, and the transition is expected to take up to two years.

“NIU values equality, diversity, inclusion and community in our student body, our faculty and staff, alumni and in the community and region we serve,” NIU President Doug Baker said. “In expanding NIU’s relationship with the ABCC and serving as the headquarter location, NIU provides another opportunity to enrich the educational experience of all of our students.”

The association’s focus on connecting culture centers in integral ways to student activities, academic programs and surrounding communities is aligned with Baker’s emphasis on building thriving communities through ethically inspired leadership.

Dr. Fred L. Hord

Dr. Fred L. Hord

“For the national Association for Black Culture Centers, our move to Northern Illinois University is both a culmination and beginning.  All ABCC Board members are extremely pleased that the exchanges of the past 15 month have come to fruition, and that each party has agreed to utilize fully our resources in this transitional period regarding mutually beneficial initiatives,” said ABCC Executive Director Fred L. Hord, who founded the association 27 years ago. “NIU has been a valuable member of our association for quite some time, and now with the new commitment to collaboration being formalized and our working together in one place, we are sure that NIU and the ABCC will chart new courses for the university and all members of our organization.”

Hosting the ABCC initiatives related to mentoring, maximizing student leadership, and supporting curricular and co-curricular cultural resonance is expected to promote student career success and to prepare NIU graduates for leadership roles in a diverse, global marketplace.

Lisa Freeman

Executive Vice President and Provost Lisa Freeman

“For life and career success, NIU students need to enjoy curricular and co-curricular experiences that develop not only a strong knowledge base and critical thinking skills, but also abilities such as listening, fairness, dialogue, intercultural communication and collaborative problem-solving,” Executive Vice President and Provost Lisa Freeman says. “Hosting the ABCC will increase the university’s ability provide our students with such opportunities inside and outside of our classrooms and strengthens the connections across our university community.”

The ABCC is a growing organization with more than 700 centers that are members or affiliates in all 50 states, and soon in the Caribbean and West Africa, increasingly involving historically and predominantly black colleges and universities, museums, community centers, as well as multicultural centers and offices.  ABCC benefits to members have expanded from networking, the newsletter and national conference discounts to include its own speakers’ bureau and traveling art exhibits, as well as discount arrangements with book and journal publishers, film/video/CD Rom companies, and online agencies.  In addition, centers have the option of applying for formal accreditation from the organization.

As part of the agreement, three members of the ABCC leadership team will join the faculty and staff of NIU in DeKalb:

  • Hord’s faculty appointment will be in the Department of Counseling Adult and Higher Education, and he will also have a position in the provost’s office. With a Ph.D. in Black Studies and Literature/History; a strong record of scholarship, teaching and learning; and significant academic leadership experience, Professor Hord will play an important consultative role in mentoring, retention, and curricular issues.
  • Terry Duffy, executive assistant to the ABCC for the last 15 years, will be critical during the ABCC’s transition to NIU, particularly with respect to building linkages and facilitating collaborations between NIU and the resources available from the ABCC member institutions. She will also play a key role in organizing ABCC conferences and events at NIU.
  • Donald Forti, who serves as ABCC webmaster, will be a joint appointment shared between ABCC and NIU’s Division of Marketing and Communications. Forti, who has a master’s degree in journalism and 13 years of experience managing the ABCC website and archived materials, will support the transition of ABCC in addition to NIU marketing and web communications functions.

An ABCC welcome event is being planned for 12:30 p.m. Friday, March 27, at NIU’s Altgeld Hall Auditorium and is open to the university community

Association for Black Culture Centers to move headquarters to NIU July 1 | NIU Today

Saturday, February 21, 2015

Crystal Lake teacher charged in prostitution sting: police - Chicago Tribune

 

Crystal Lake South High School teacher has been placed on leave after his arrest in a prostitution sting, according to school and police officials.

 

Science teacher Brian Akers, 46, of Woodstock, was among eight men who were arrested Tuesday by Rockford police after the men allegedly responded to fictitious online prostitution ads that were posted as part of a police sting operation, Rockford authorities said in a news release.

Akers was charged with solicitation of a sexual act, police said.

Suburban Chicago arrest photos

Suburban Chicago arrest photosOpen link

Principal Scott Shepard sent an email to parents late Thursday saying Community High School District 155 learned that day that an unnamed Crystal Lake South faculty member had been arrested.

"At this time, to the best of our knowledge, the arrest concerns alleged conduct away from school, outside of school hours, and not involving any District 155 students or other staff members," the email said. "We have no reason to suspect that any student or staff member in the district has been in any danger at any time."

Crystal Lake teacher charged in prostitution sting: police - Chicago Tribune

Friday, February 20, 2015

April 7 School Board Election

Registered voters living within the boundaries of the Belvidere School District will be asked to elect three individuals to the Board of Education at the April 7, 2015 election.  This page has been established to provide basic information about the function and responsibilities of the Board of Education and to introduce you to candidates running for the three seats.

 

How to Choose a School Board Candidate:  What Every Voter Should Know

 

Written by the Staff of GreatSchools

Getting involved with your local board of education doesn't have to mean running your own campaign for a seat or taking detailed notes at every single meeting.  The first simple step--one that every registered voter should take very seriously--is voting in the election of school board members.

Read on to find out how school boards work, what they do, how they can be effective, and what you should know about the candidates before heading to the polls.

What is a board of education?

School board members make up the largest body of elected officials in the United States.  We entrust them to set the polices of our most treasured institutions:  Our public elementary, middle, and high schools.  Every district has a board of education, and boards generally meet every month in meetings that are open to the public.

These gatherings range from tame rubber-stamping sessions to intense, provocative discussions with the community where controversial issues are debated and landmark decisions are made.

School boards are nonpartisan.  In most districts, members serve four-year terms and terms are staggered so seats do not become open all at once.  In general, to run for school board you have to be at least 18 years old, a citizen of the state, a resident of the district, a registered voter, and eligible under the state constitution to be elected to public office.

In most cases, a school district employee cannot be a board member in that district.  This means no teacher, principal, librarian, custodian, or anyone else that works in a school in the district can serve on the school board unless the resign from the employed position.

School districts are complex corporation; they are often the largest employers in a community and the decisions they make reach far, affecting jobs, resources, and most importantly the education of all children.

What do they do?

Somewhere in between the agendas, public comment sessions, and resolutions school boards make a number of important decisions.  School boards establish a vision for the community's schools.  They have to set up and maintain an effective, efficient organizational structure for the district that lets the superintendent and administrators manage the schools, teachers teach, and students learn.

They are responsible for hiring and evaluating a superintendent, evaluating and adopting policies that affect all schools in the district, serving as a judicial and appeals body when conflicts go unresolved, monitoring and adjusting district finances, and managing the collective bargaining process in the district.

A school board has a symbolic role as well.  The behavior it shows off in the meeting room, the rapport among school board members, and the relationships that members have with teachers and administrators in the district all add up to the climate of public education in a community.  Whether healthy or dysfunctional, a school board has a heavy influence on the spirit that characterizes a community's impression of its school system.

How can I tell if my school board is doing a good job?

By attending a few school board meetings, you will learn firsthand what school boards do.  Call your district office to find out where and when meetings are held.  Once you've observed your school board in action, you will be prepared to ask the following questions:

•  How does the school board make decisions?  Do the members function as predictable, single-issue advocates or do they approach each decision with an open mind?  Do they seem to make strategic choices for the well-being of the district?  Strong decision-making requires analysis, the balancing of needs and concerns, and the ability to see the long-term implications of an action.

•  How's the team spirit?  Does the board exhibit a healthy group dynamic, or is it a parade of egos marching single-file?  Do members show respect and trust for each other and for the operating rules of the board?

•  Is the board's authority well defined?  The classic challenges of management do not skip over your board of education.  There's a delicate balance between the board's act of choosing a strong chief executive (the superintendent) and letting him or her lead the way and the board's tendency to get involved with many levels of decision-making.

•  Does the board understand the community?  One of the most difficult parts of school governance is creating a strong relationship with the public.  An effective board knows and respects its community and encourages the community's trust in its school system.

What should I look for in a school board candidate?

First of all, you should think about the issues that are important to you in your school district.  Are you concerned about student transportation, textbook adoption, funding for extracurricular activities, new curriculum standards, or construction of new school facilities?  What's your hot button?  You will want to find out where the candidates stand on issues that are important to you.

You might also look for the following qualities:

•  The ability to work well with a team and support group decisions, along with an understanding that the board sets a climate for the entire district.

•  A desire to work toward a stronger relationship between the district and the public it serves.

•  A keen eye toward serving the needs of all students, regardless of their abilities and backgrounds.

•  A professional, poised demeanor and respectful, respectable behavior.

•  Respect for diverse points of view.

•  Commitment to the time and energy required each week for meetings, phone calls, conversations, visits to schools, and professional development seminars and workshops.

•  Knowledge about district policies, guidelines, needs, challenges, and strengths.

At the heart of it all, members of a district's board of education must believe, unequivocally, in the value of public education.  They must be dedicated to serving and teaching all children.  They must believe n the democratic process and understand that their role is to act strategically, in line with the interests of the entire school community.

April 7, 2015 Election

On April 7 voters will be asked to select one individual from Belvidere Township and two individuals from the remaining congressional townships to fill three 4-year terms on the Board of Education.  The following names will appear on the ballot:

 

Belvidere Township (Vote for 1):

Allison Reid-Niemeic

Michael Rathbun

Frank Marks

Remaining Congressional Townships (Vote for 2):

Holly A. Houk

Lynette Danzl-Tauer

Heather Sell-Wick

Kelly Galluzzo

 

Information above and below is taken from District 100 website and is accessible by clicking on the following:  April School Board Election

 

Belvidere Township (Vote for 1):

 

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Remaining Congressional Townships (Vote for 2):

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