Tuesday, June 21, 2016

The great success of Vision 100 continues to advertised by UNICOM-ARC

The Marketing firm UNICOM-ARC continues to use District 100 as one of five great accomplishments in the realm of school referendum.  Very interesting Dr. Schlomann just spent $12,000 with the company to begin an April 2017 referendum in his current school district/,  St. Charles District 303.

 SEE:   http://www.kcchronicle.com/2016/06/17/survey-results-sway-st-charles-school-board-away-from-november-referendum/a5d9hpx/

 

Client: Belvidere Community Unit School           District 100
Challenge: The City of Belvidere, an eastern suburb of Rockford, Illinois was becoming a far west suburb of Chicago. As a result, school enrollment was exploding. Unfortunately, the District was plagued with the same kind of electoral problems facing many of the Districts in the Rockford area: multiple losses at the polls by margins at or exceeding two to one.
Solution: A community engagement program was used to generate community understanding and support for a second high school and additional facility improvements. Following that program, UNICOM•ARC worked with “Citizens with a Vision” in developing an aggressive campaign that involved extensive door-to-door direct voter contact programs, distribution of an informational video (reproduced on DVD), direct mail, movie theater slides, television advertising and automated phone calls. Following the election, the District was able to build a second high school and another elementary school and embark on the second phase of its long term plan for improving the schools.

Above is from:  http://www.unicomarc.com/electionsstories.php

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

DePaul in Spotlight after controversial speaker and new President is being searched by the school—any connection?

image

In recent days, Minster, a freshman and vice president of the DePaul College Republicans, has become accustomed to other labels: “racist,” “white supremacist.”

The group drew the fury of activists after they invited the conservative online writer Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on May 24. Protesters stormed the stage, ultimately forcing Yiannopoulos and his hosts to abandon the student center’s auditorium, the first time current college administrators could recall such an ending to a campus event.

Students who attended were furious that security didn’t give the protesters the boot, while others were enraged that Yiannopoulos — who delights in mocking feminists and civil rights activists, among others — was allowed to speak on campus at all.

In a June 2 email to the entire university community, DePaul President Dennis Holtschneider wrote: “I am deeply sorry for the harm that was unleashed by a speaker whose intent was to ignite racial tensions and demean those most marginalized, both in our society and at DePaul.”

Holtschneider noted concerns from earlier in the year of black students “growing weary of the racism they found at DePaul.” But the president, promising to put together a task force to look at speech on campus, said “the bar on free speech is extremely high at a university.”

In its May 31 edition, The DePaulia student newspaper devoted eight of nine news pages to the Yiannopoulos event and the fallout from it, with the paper’s editor in chief, Matthew Paras, describing it as the biggest breaking news story on campus during his five years at the publication.

The incident has dramatically raised the profile of an organization that sometimes has difficulty filling a small college classroom for its weekly meetings.

“We typically get a lot of people who come in and out,” Minster, who is studying economics, said during a chat at the student center.

“Or they just don’t want to be seen with us,” joked Nicole Been, 21, president of the Republican group.

Perhaps even less so now.

Been, who is from Orland Park and calls herself a strong Donald Trump supporter, said she’s been getting a lot of “mean looks” on campus.

“Just a few days ago, me and my friend were walking . . . and people started following us and yelling, ‘white supremacist,’ ‘racist,’ ” said Been, an education major. “People started following me to the quad. I was not looking my best that day, and I was surprised they recognized me.”

Been and Minster said they expected protesters when their group invited Yiannopoulos to speak. At the DePaul event, after the protesters, mostly African-Americans, took over the stage, Yiannopoulos, who is gay, said: “I worked out why there are so many black girls here. I think it’s because I f—– their brothers.”

But Minster and Been expected the campus security to remove the protesters, which didn’t happened.

The DePaul Republicans say they chose Yiannopoulos, in part, because they’d had limited success with past on-campus events.

“People would come, but they’d be on their phones,” Been said. “They weren’t real excited about it.”

Former U.S. senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum drew about 100 people last week. About 550 people came to hear Yiannopoulos, Minster said.

“We don’t support racism, period,” Minster said. “But we do support interesting arguments that sort of challenge the norms that people think about every day at this school. DePaul prides itself on social justice, diversity and multiculturalism and all those things. So we thought it would be interesting to bring someone who is directly against all those things.”

Mario Morrow Jr., president of DePaul’s Black Student Union, said Yiannopolous clearly crosses the line: “He is promoting hate speech, making it seem OK to everyone that this is acceptable language to use, especially on a college campus built on diversity.”

Neither Minster nor Been said they plan to avoid controversial speakers for future events. They do plan to make sure they have sufficient security.

Does either have regrets about attending a college where perhaps a majority of the students don’t share their political leanings?

Both say no. They have opportunities at DePaul that they might not have at a more traditionally conservative school.

“Gov. Rauner’s people came to me and we’re like, we need to start this thing up and get him elected,” Been said. “[U.S. Sen.] Mark Kirk’s people have been reaching out to us. Opportunities are endless here because there are so few of us. So everything is at our fingertips.”

Said Minster: “I’m not looking to go to a school that might tell me exactly what I might already know. I would prefer if DePaul had a little bit more of a conservative lean than where we are now.”

“Or even just like a moderate lean,” Been added.

In recent days, Minster, a freshman and vice president of the DePaul College Republicans, has become accustomed to other labels: “racist,” “white supremacist.”

The group drew the fury of activists after they invited the conservative online writer Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on May 24. Protesters stormed the stage, ultimately forcing Yiannopoulos and his hosts to abandon the student center’s auditorium, the first time current college administrators could recall such an ending to a campus event.

Students who attended were furious that security didn’t give the protesters the boot, while others were enraged that Yiannopoulos — who delights in mocking feminists and civil rights activists, among others — was allowed to speak on campus at all.

In a June 2 email to the entire university community, DePaul President Dennis Holtschneider wrote: “I am deeply sorry for the harm that was unleashed by a speaker whose intent was to ignite racial tensions and demean those most marginalized, both in our society and at DePaul.”

Holtschneider noted concerns from earlier in the year of black students “growing weary of the racism they found at DePaul.” But the president, promising to put together a task force to look at speech on campus, said “the bar on free speech is extremely high at a university.”

In its May 31 edition, The DePaulia student newspaper devoted eight of nine news pages to the Yiannopoulos event and the fallout from it, with the paper’s editor in chief, Matthew Paras, describing it as the biggest breaking news story on campus during his five years at the publication.

The incident has dramatically raised the profile of an organization that sometimes has difficulty filling a small college classroom for its weekly meetings.

“We typically get a lot of people who come in and out,” Minster, who is studying economics, said during a chat at the student center.

“Or they just don’t want to be seen with us,” joked Nicole Been, 21, president of the Republican group.

Perhaps even less so now.

Been, who is from Orland Park and calls herself a strong Donald Trump supporter, said she’s been getting a lot of “mean looks” on campus.

“Just a few days ago, me and my friend were walking . . . and people started following us and yelling, ‘white supremacist,’ ‘racist,’ ” said Been, an education major. “People started following me to the quad. I was not looking my best that day, and I was surprised they recognized me.”

Been and Minster said they expected protesters when their group invited Yiannopoulos to speak. At the DePaul event, after the protesters, mostly African-Americans, took over the stage, Yiannopoulos, who is gay, said: “I worked out why there are so many black girls here. I think it’s because I f—– their brothers.”

But Minster and Been expected the campus security to remove the protesters, which didn’t happened.

The DePaul Republicans say they chose Yiannopoulos, in part, because they’d had limited success with past on-campus events.

“People would come, but they’d be on their phones,” Been said. “They weren’t real excited about it.”

Former U.S. senator and presidential candidate Rick Santorum drew about 100 people last week. About 550 people came to hear Yiannopoulos, Minster said.

“We don’t support racism, period,” Minster said. “But we do support interesting arguments that sort of challenge the norms that people think about every day at this school. DePaul prides itself on social justice, diversity and multiculturalism and all those things. So we thought it would be interesting to bring someone who is directly against all those things.”

Mario Morrow Jr., president of DePaul’s Black Student Union, said Yiannopolous clearly crosses the line: “He is promoting hate speech, making it seem OK to everyone that this is acceptable language to use, especially on a college campus built on diversity.”

Neither Minster nor Been said they plan to avoid controversial speakers for future events. They do plan to make sure they have sufficient security.

Does either have regrets about attending a college where perhaps a majority of the students don’t share their political leanings?

Both say no. They have opportunities at DePaul that they might not have at a more traditionally conservative school.

“Gov. Rauner’s people came to me and we’re like, we need to start this thing up and get him elected,” Been said. “[U.S. Sen.] Mark Kirk’s people have been reaching out to us. Opportunities are endless here because there are so few of us. So everything is at our fingertips.”

Said Minster: “I’m not looking to go to a school that might tell me exactly what I might already know. I would prefer if DePaul had a little bit more of a conservative lean than where we are now.”

“Or even just like a moderate lean,” Been added.

Above is from:  http://chicago.suntimes.com/news/depaul-republicans-spotlight-controversial-speaker/

 

*****************************************

DePaul University

Dear DePaul Alumni,
Yesterday, I informed the Board of Trustees that I would be stepping down as president of DePaul University at the end of the 2016-17 academic year. You are a key part of the DePaul family, and I wanted to write you as well.
My twelve years at DePaul have been blessed ones. Much of what we set out to do more than a decade ago has been accomplished. We have built or renovated facilities for all ten of DePaul's colleges, our library and many of our athletic teams. We have established over 75 new academic programs, including new colleges of Communication and Science/Health, as well as schools of hospitality and film. Every year, DePaul is becoming more of a national university instead of a regional one. Through all the change, we have stayed true to our mission of assisting those of modest means to access a life-changing education.
While there is always more to do, the current strategic plan is coming to an end. All of the buildings on the master plan have been built or are currently in construction. The campaign to fund these plans was concluded successfully. 2017 will be a natural moment in the university's life to seek new leadership and define the next set of ambitions, so I have decided to step aside so this transition can happen now.
While there has been some speculation in the press that the timing of my announcement was related to a controversial speaker that was on campus at the end of the spring quarter, in fact, my religious superior approved this decision in January, the board leadership was informed in early March and a search firm was contracted in early May. The two are entirely unrelated.
I know I will look back on my years leading DePaul with overflowing gratitude. It has been my privilege to meet thousands of alumni, and I am continually impressed with your passion for and dedication to DePaul. As an important university constituency, alumni will have an opportunity to express their views as to the desired qualities of DePaul's next president. Graduates may contribute their thoughts to the following dedicated email account: presidentsearch@depaul.edu. In your message, please indicate that you are an alumnus/a.
For more information, please see the press release issued by our board chair (http://depaulne.ws/pres). Thank you for all you have done for the university and will continue to do in the years to come. We are a stronger university because you, our alumni, love this university and support us in so many ways.
God bless you,
Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider, C.M.
President

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Rauner delivers one school message in Chicago, another Downstate

image

Tina Sfondeles

@TinaSfon | email

Fran Spielman

@fspielman | email

  A week after legislators left Springfield with no budget and no plan to fund education, Gov. Bruce Rauner began his Monday morning in Chicago, where he likened some of Chicago Public Schools to “crumbling prisons.”

By mid-day, the governor made his way to Ottawa — his third of three planned stops — where he again chose to pit Chicago against the rest of the state. There he reminded taxpayers to dial up their state representative —State Rep. Andy Skoog, a Democrat targeted by Republicans — to have him stand up against the “Chicago political machine

“They want your tax dollars to bail out Chicago,” Rauner said at an Ottawa courthouse. “That’s not right. It’s not fair to the people of LaSalle County or any other county in the state of Illinois. So we cannot allow that to happen. It’s not fair. But the super majority Democrats have said, publicly said, they want to hold up school funding. They want your schools not to open as leverage to try to force you to bail out the city of Chicago.”

The governor was met by dozens of union protesters, which forced a venue change in the town of about 18,500.

“I’m not anti-union. I’m pro-job creation, and I’m pro-taxpayer,” Rauner told the crowd, while reminding them his grandfather was a dairy farmer and union member.

It was a day of disparate messages for Rauner, who had set out to advocate for an education funding bill and a stopgap budget, but found himself calling Mayor Rahm Emanuel the “one major disappointment” during his 18-month term as governor, and also added “woeful” and “tragic” to his description of some CPS schools.

“The simple fact is that when you look objectively at the state of Chicago Public Schools, many of them are inadequate. Many of them are woeful, and some are just tragic. Many of them are basically almost crumbling prisons. They’re not a place a young person should be educated,” Rauner said.

The comments sparked outrage on Twitter, where CPS parents and students began a #notaprison campaign, detailing accomplishments at their schools.

It also brought out another Donald Trump comparison from Emanuel. Last week, Emanuel likened Rauner to the presumptive Republican presidential and condemned Rauner’s blame-game tour of the state.

On Monday, the mayor responded to Rauner comparing some CPS schools to “crumbling prisons” by escalating the war of words with his old friend, former business associate and vacation companion.

“Last week, I said his rhetoric of division and divisiveness — of targeting [and pitting] one group of people against another — was Trump-like. Now, it sounds like he’s auditioning to be Donald Trump’s running mate,” the mayor said.

Emanuel said Rauner “may have a stereotype that plays to his political philosophy, but those are not the results” in Chicago Public Schools under the mayor’s five-year watch.

“I would just say to him, ‘This is not about right-wing ideology. It’s about results.’”

“Now, I know you’re gonna try to play a political game and some rhetoric. [But] I ask all of you to do the responsible thing and put the data out about what the results are. It’s a University of Chicago report that talks about graduation rates, college attendance that are hitting remarkable highs,” the mayor said. The Sun-Times first reported the results Monday.

During his Chicago stop at technology hub 1871, Rauner talked about the failure of the General Assembly to pass a budget and said he is “deeply concerned” that schools might not open on time this fall.

While Rauner has said he’d put his “Turnaround Agenda” aside to fund education and get the state running, albeit temporary, he’s still advocating for changes in collective bargaining and workers compensation. Democrats say that will hurt the middle class. And Rauner has consistently said he won’t support a tax hike to balance the budget unless some of his favored reforms are attached.

Meanwhile, Democrats are trying to find a way to fund education and have long favored a complete reworking of the school funding formula. But for now, Rauner is pushing support for a bill to keep the doors open this fall that doesn’t include an overhaul of the formula.

Above is from:  http://chicago.suntimes.com/news/gov-rauner-calls-some-cps-schools-are-like-crumbling-prisons/